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Stuttering

Stuttering is a speech disorder involving frequent problems with the normal fluency and flow of speech. 

Stuttering Clinical Trials

Researchers continue to study the underlying causes of developmental stuttering. Possible causes of developmental stuttering include abnormalities in speech motor control and genetics. 

Stuttering clinical trials, like those at CNS Healthcare, can help you explore new options. Interested in trying a new stuttering treatment at no cost? Find out more about enrolling stuttering clinical trials available by selecting one of the below locations near you. Use the form on the page to schedule a free, in-office consultation to find out if a stuttering trial is right for you. 

LEARN MORE ABOUT CURRENTLY ENROLLING STUTTERING CLINICAL TRIALS BY CLICKING ON A LOCATION NEAR YOU


More About Stuttering

Stuttering is common among young children as a normal part of learning to speak. Young children may stutter when their speech and language abilities aren’t developed enough to keep up with what they want to say. Most children outgrow this developmental stuttering. 

Speech fluency can be disrupted from causes other than developmental stuttering. A stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other brain disorders can cause speech that is slow or has pauses or repeated sounds (neurogenic stuttering).

Speech fluency can also be disrupted in the context of emotional distress. Speakers who do not stutter may experience dysfluency when they are nervous or feeling pressured. These situations may also cause speakers who stutter to be less fluent.

It's common for children between the ages of 2 and 5 years to go through periods when they may stutter. For most children, this is part of learning to speak, and it gets better on its own. However, stuttering that persists may require treatment to improve speech fluency.

Call your doctor for a referral or contact a speech-language pathologist directly for an appointment if stuttering:

  • Lasts more than six months
  • Occurs with other speech or language problems
  • Becomes more frequent or continues as the child grows older
  • Occurs with muscle tightening or visibly struggling to speak
  • Affects the ability to effectively communicate at school, at work or in social interactions
  • Causes anxiety or emotional problems, such as fear or avoidance of situations where speaking is required
  • Begins as an adult 

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

Stuttering signs and symptoms may include:

  • Difficulty starting a word, phrase or sentence
  • Prolonging a word or sounds within a word
  • Repetition of a sound, syllable or word
  • Brief silence for certain syllables or words, or pauses within a word (broken word)
  • Addition of extra words such as "um" if difficulty moving to the next word is anticipated
  • Excess tension, tightness, or movement of the face or upper body to produce a word
  • Anxiety about talking
  • Limited ability to effectively communicate

 

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Jacksonville, FL:
904-281-5757
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901-843-1045
Orlando, FL:
407-425-5100